Wednesday, 2 March 2011

Moughton Whetstone

Moughton Whetstone Hole  SD 78447 - 71902

The Moughton Whetstone is a concentrically banded, (red/purple and green), mudstone that was quarried to make whetstones for the Sheffield razor industry.
Reading Bernard's Blog on his trip to Moughton http://rossendalewalks.blogspot.com/2011/02/moughton.html
I thought I'd add this as a reply
Parked below Horton in Ribblesdale station and took the footpath through it Photo 1
followed the footpath through Sulber Nick to the crossroads at Photo 2
taking the Clapham footpath as far as Sulber Gate Photo 3 over looking Thieves Moss with Pendle Hill in the far distance
at the cairn at Beggars Stile Photo 4 I left the footpath to follow Moughton Scar edge, the line of cliffs just above the cairn
1/2 way along and looking back at Inglebourgh Photo 5
Moughton Whetstone ruins come into view at 6
but you still have to walk round the cliff edge to get to the footpath, on right Photo 7, going down into the Hole
I'm glad the spring was still flowing as it was so hot I was ready for a brew and boil a couple of kettles and let them cool in the stream to refill my water bottles.
 brew up and a French Merlot
 Lamb and mint burgher with home made bread and vine tomatoes (not shown) and a French Merlot for dinner
with Penyghent coming into view by Photo 8
and on the last lap downhill from Photo 9
this joins back onto the path going to Sulber Nick and so completing a loop, there were 100's of small blue butterflies the whole way round
 yet on another time round there was no blues but hundreds of these
 I vist here allot and always start from Horton in Ribblesdale, another Teddy Tour Tea at the ruin :-
but after reading Bernard's trip I'll give it a go from the Austwick and Thwaite side and approach from this direction (ruins just below scree) when I climbed up to bag the Trig-point
there's lots of Butterwort around the spring
a carnivorous plant with sticky leaves to catch flies etc.
and in season lots of Wheatears feeding their young here with a Crane Fly larve
just thought I'd share, thanks Bernard cheers all Danny

11 comments:

  1. Thoroughly enjoyed your post, and something of an education with details on flora and fauna.
    I'm up that way on Sunday, and may just try your route.
    Thanks again

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  2. If you finish back at Horton in Ribblesdale the Black Sheep Bitter at the Crown is worth a try.
    cheers Danny

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  3. I think your top butterfly is a blue!... 'Common Blue' (Polyommatus icarus) Their wings are blue or brown, with white-ringed black spots and orange marks on the undersides. The second butterfly is a 'fritillary' could be one of three, Silver-washed, Pearl-bordered or High brown. Nice pictures, beautiful country.

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  4. Well you've certainly whetted my appetite Danny - I read a lot of walking blogs but yours is becoming a favourite because your posts so consistently make me think -'I must go there' or 'I must try that'

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  5. Thanks Mark,if you wanted to make this walk a linear it would tie in with the Norber erratics above Clapham. I'll put the next Blog up on them tomorrow -- cheers Danny

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  6. top post mate and I like your blog :)

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  7. great photograthy.

    but teddy is spoilt with those burgers:)

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  8. I have some of these whetstones and they are excellent,been sharpening my knives today.

    Ill put some pics up in my blog Danny.

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  9. Wonderful information concerning those whetstones. I am a green wood worker with a passion for the past and I hadn't heard of Moughton Whetstones. I had only just recently been educated on the Charnley Forest Oilstone so this is a new one on me. Excellent post and top teddy!

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  10. excellent work, many thanks Steve Ak

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